Monday, January 31, 2011

Are They BagSnobs or BagBullies?

Today, a fellow blogger started a Twitter campaign against counterfeit goods called, "Say No to Fakes." The original tweet was:

BagSnob: Let's start each Monday w/ #SayNoToFake campaign! If u see someone with a fake bag, twitpic them. It will take all of us to stop fake bags!
Although we don't condone counterfeiting in anyway, these types of campaigns seem to target young ladies and girls and expose them to ridicule and public humiliation. By singling out women who may not be able to afford the most coveted fashion of the moment we run the risk of creating an environment of myopic judgment and prejudice.

As a matter of fact, a study in 2009 from MIT's Sloan School of Management, found that 46% of those who bought a counterfeit brand-name purse, went and bought the real thing within two and a half years. The study continued to report that the claims from the industry about the supposed "harm" from counterfeiting wasn't just overblown, but were blown so far out of proportion as to be ridiculous.

Although there may be a moral issue associated with stealing another person's creative design, we believe the cost of personal degradation is much higher. We would advise BagSnob to retract their twitpic campaign and make a more concerted effort to highlight fashionable designer alternatives.

If you like, be a snob but don't be a bully.

Follow-up: BagSnob responded and said that the intention was never to single out individuals but to help consumers identify counterfeit merchandise through photographs.

At MadisonAvenueSpy. we agree that there is an entire universe of knock-offs, from Moncler coats to synthetic diamonds. It is a tragic situation any time a customer is "taken" by a charlatan. We are glad that this topic is being discussed and look forward to working together in creating an eduction platform.

14 comments:

Nostalia Moon said...

I agree! Taking pictures of women and girls with fake bags is too extreme, especially since it targets the person more than the counterfeit industry. It's touching too close on supporting attacks against specific people--next thing you know there will be public violence which would have led from the twitpic campaign.

Anonymous said...

I don't like fakes either, but this woman needs to get off her high horse. Not every bored housewife with a blog has a husband who can foot the bills from Hermes.

Klara said...

Yeah, they are going over the line with this, interfering with people#s choices. Fake bags aren't nice but you shouldn't judge the people who are wearing them, the best solution is to just spread a campaign on the internet instead and try to affect women this way. Not being mean!

http://fashionnews.zalando.co.uk

April said...

Fake ,imitation ,replica or knock off . They are all one name for counterfeit merchandise = crime. It cost legitimate businesses billions yearly. The "harm" as you put it from counterfeiting isn't overblown.It's facts and numbers.Taking pics of fake bags were not targeting ,judging nor bullying women. That wasn't the intention .Instead of attacking bagsnob personally ,why not state your point of view and say that you think twipic is too extream and let's spread the word in another way. Suggest alternatives.Open up a dialogue. We need to be positive to make a change.

FashionablyFit said...

the intention was to draw attention to the bag ~ not the individual carrying it. you should go check out twitter again...they've clarified their intentions. if anything, they've encouraged people to buy the "teamed" effort bags (i.e. Carlos Falchi for Target, Simply Vera @ Kohl's, etc) rather than a fake.

KC said...

QUIT USING THE BUZZWORD OF THE MOMENT, CAMILLE.

Just kidding. I think the twitpic campaign is really rude. I used to post fashion disaster outfits from the street on my blog and I got a lot of hateful comments, so I stopped. I was teased for carrying fakes when I was in high school and it still bothers me. However, once I started earning my own money, I bought the real thing and it was that much more satisfying.

If they want to highlight fakes, there are plenty of sites (especially eBay guides) that show you how to detect them. No need to twitpic real people.

FlauntStyle said...

Do you know that there is a bigger picture associated with showing the pictures. Should they have blacked out faces, yes. Did you know that by purchasing counterfeit items (i.e. handbags or sunglasses) you are supporting child labor and trafficking, drug trafficking and even funding terrorist groups? That is the message BagSnob and @NeverFakes are trying to convey. I just posted about this issue this morning, feel free to read it.

flauntstyle said...

Sorry if I sound insensitive to the girls being photographed in my previous comment, that is not my intent. I do know that the purpose of the tweet was awareness not bullying, I would never condone bullying of any kind. I am a mother and know better.

Katie said...

@neverfakes tweeted this isn't their campaign. this is bagsnob

Anonymous said...

Bag snob is a silly blog. Last year one of the bloggers talked about charging up her credit card shopping, despite her husband pleadings to stop since he was trying to refi their mortgage. Another sign of immaturity

Browndog said...

@FlauntStyle As a mother, how would you feel if it was your child they were photographing and posting on twitter? And the child labor claim, while probably accurate in some cases, is also accurate for many legitimately purchased goods. Do you know who made each article of clothing in your closet? I would guess not.. I don't support counterfeiting but I also don't support bullying and attacking others that may not be able to afford the items they really want or may not have the knowledge to know the difference between a real and a fake. Let the attorneys for the luxury retailers go after the producers of counterfeits. Those companies have the right and the means to defend their intellectual property. And in the meantime, do you really feel good about publicly shaming a 21 year old wearing fake Louboutins or a 16 year old with a fake Louis? Don't we all have better things to do with our time? I left the mean girl in me behind in high school and good riddance to her.

Anonymous said...

Bagsnob has a pr tie-in with a few designers, in addition to fees from website links. They are motivated by money so you have to keep that in mind. I don't think there is anything wrong with bloggers accepting payments or charging for advertisements. The issue with Bagsnob is that they attempt to hide the graft

Anonymous said...

I'm going to follow up on Browndogs comment and say:

@FlauntStyle: It bugs me when people get all high and mighty about how fakes condone child labor and what not, when their own precious genuine bags come from some of the biggest perpetrators of child and sweat shop labor.
In fact, in 2007, UNICEF officers were against an alliance with Gucci because Gucci uses Child Labor to manufacture their goods. Where do you think Gap, Burberry, Apple, Nike, or Top Shop get their clothing?

So yeah, next time you complain about child labor in the manufacturing of fake goods, remember that it's also apparent in most of the things you own and love. Child labor is a problem that is not limited to knockoffs, and thinking that it is only furthers the problem, not solves it.

Anonymous said...

I follow her tweets. She means well, but is a bit shallow. She probably didn't think it through. It'd be more effective to go after the counterfeitters rather than the teenagers buying this stuff. Though counterfeitting is harmful, a twitter campaign is ridiculous when many don't have homes, jobs, or health insurance.